Julian J. Schlöder [ˈjuːli̯aːn ˈʃløːdɐ]

Research Projects

inferentialism

With Luca Incurvati, I am developing an inferentialist account of logic that seeks to reduce the meaning of some logical connectives to the dynamics of certain speech acts. For instance, we have developed an account of rejection that explains the negation connective. In ongoing work we expand this approach to modal operators like 'might'. Moreover, our inferentialism is able to avoid some semantic paradoxes by systematically excluding certain reductio proofs, while still justifying classical inference as the logic of asserted content.

Luca Incurvati and Julian J. Schlöder. Weak Rejection, Australasian Journal of Philosophy. (to appear, pdf, supplement)

speech acts

I'm developing a formal account of the speech acts assertion and rejection. The account is grounded in considering these acts in dialogue; in particular under the understanding that (i) speech acts are made to an addressee and with particular intentions, (ii) that it is fundamental that assertions can be rejected or retracted, and (iii) that the two acts are, in some sense, dual. As dialogical phenomena, there are also relevant auxiliary conversational mechanisms to consider. I am particularly interested in 'Why'-questions which (can) relate to intentionality. I pursue the different angles and related phenomena with different collaborators: Nicholas Asher, Ellen Breitholtz, Raquel Fernández and Antoine Venant.

Julian J. Schlöder, Antoine Venant and Nicholas Asher (2017). Aligning Intentions: Acceptance and Rejection in Dialogue, Sinn und Bedeutung 21. (to appear)
Julian J. Schlöder, Ellen Breitholtz and Raquel Fernández (2016). Why?, Proceedings of the 20th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue (SemDial 2016, "JerSem"). (pdf)
Julian J. Schlöder and Raquel Fernández (2015). Pragmatic Rejection, Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computational Semantics (IWCS 2015). (pdf, data)
Julian J. Schlöder and Raquel Fernández (2015). Clarifying Intentions in Dialogue: A Corpus Study, Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computational Semantics (IWCS 2015). (pdf, data)
Julian J. Schlöder and Raquel Fernández (2014). Clarification Requests on the Level of Uptake, Proceedings of the 18th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue (SemDial 2014, "DialWatt"). (pdf, poster)

formal semantics

I have found that there are cases where assertion and rejection can only be told apart by looking at the intonation and focal structure of an utterance. With Alex Lascarides, I am developing a pragmatic account of intonation in the SDRT framework. The theory has it that the semantic contribution of an intonational contour is highly underspecified. Depending on the context, the resolution of these underspecifications leads to computable implicatures.

Some of this work was featured on the Language Log.

Julian J. Schlöder and Alex Lascarides (2015). Interpreting English Pitch Contours in Context, Proceedings of the 19th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue (SemDial 2015, "goDial"). (pdf)
Julian J. Schlöder (2015). A Formal Semantics of the Final Rise, ESSLLI 2015 Student Session. (pdf)

past research

set theory

Long forcing iterations often require bookkeeping devices such as Laver functions; most notably in Baumgartner's proof of the consistency of PFA relative a supercompact. Finding an appropriate bookkeeping device can be a lot of work. I have shown that the need for such functions can be removed by tailoring the forcing iterations to only use counterexamples to a given forcing axiom. My approach is now taught in advanced classes on Forcing in Bonn, e.g. in summer 2014.

Julian J. Schlöder (2013). Forcing with Minimal Counterexamples, Young Set Theory Workshop 2013, Poster Sessions. (pdf)
Julian J. Schlöder (2013). Forcing Axioms Through Iterations of Minimal Counterexamples, Master's thesis, University of Bonn. (pdf, errata)

formal mathematics

Gödel's completeness theorem states that any mathematical theorem can be formalized into a machine-verifiable formal proof. A big library of such proofs is the Mizar Mathematical Library. I contributed a proof of Gödel's completeness theorem itself.

At Naproche I worked on creating a language for mathematics that seems natural to mathematicians, but is machine-verifiable by a computer.

Julian J. Schlöder and Peter Koepke (2012). Transition of Consistency and Satisfiability under Language Extensions, Formalized Mathematics, Vol 20/3. (html, code, pdf paper (automatically generated))
Julian J. Schlöder and Peter Koepke (2012). The Gödel Completeness Theorem for Uncountable Languages, Formalized Mathematics, Vol 20/3. (html, code, pdf paper (automatically generated))